Stellar Living Glossary

Understanding medical terminology can be tedious and difficult. Are you searching for the difference between Alzheimer’s or dementia, or just looking to understand certain terms better? Look no further. We’ve put together an easy-to-understand glossary, compiled with common words associated with elder health care. Each definition is simple and straightforward. Click on a term to read more.

Active Adult Living

Active Adult Living refers to adults that continue to be active in their daily life, without the need for support or retirement within their adult community. [1][2] Active Adult Living often includes adult that enjoy physical activity and community based events.[1]

  1. Newhomessection.com. (2009) Glossary of Real Estate Terms. Retrieved August 9, 2009, from http://newhomessection.com/articles/.
  2. Bankrate.com. (February 24, 2005). Active adult living residents aren’t retiring types. Retrieved August 9, 2009, from http://www.bankrate.com/vcs/news/real-estate/20050224a1.asp.

Adult Day Care

Adult Day Care is an option alternative to hiring a caregiver for an elder.[1] Having alternative care, other than a caregiver, gives the elder the opportunity to socialize and participate in group activities.[1] Adult Day Care relieves the caregiver of their duties for the day.[2] Often there are scheduled meals, recreational activities and outings to allow for change of routine.[2]

  1. Eldercare.gov. (October 15, 2015.) Adult Day Care. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare.NET/Public/Resources/Factsheets/Adult_Day_Care.aspx
  2. Caregiverslibrary.com. (n.d) What is Adult Day Care? Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.caregiverslibrary.org/caregivers-resources/grp-caring-for-yourself/hsgrp-support-systems/what-is-adult-day-care-article.aspx

Alzheimer’s Care

Alzheimer’s Care is providing patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) proper assistance in everyday activities they can no longer perform alone.[1] The care goes beyond daily routine activities to giving time for activities that the specific Alzheimer’s patients enjoy, such as gardening, walks, listening to music and dancing.[1] Alzheimer’s care can also include housing.[1]  

  1. Helpguide.org. (August, 2015.) Dementia and Alzheimer’s Care. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/alzheimers-dementia/dementia-and-alzheimers-care.htm

Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia often associated with memory loss and behavior change.[1] Alzheimer’s patients experience different types of memory loss and change in behavior as no patient’s Alzheimer’s is the same.[1] Confusion and disassociation are commonly linked to the disease.[1] There is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

  1. Alzheimers.gov. (n.d.) Alzheimer’s is…. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.alzheimers.gov/symptoms.html

Assisted Living 

Assisted Living is long-term care that provides seniors with individualized support such as meals, daily routine activities, transportation and help with personal hygiene.[1] Assisted Living’s purpose is to give seniors help with activities they cannot perform alone or give them the extra support they need to perform the activities by themselves.[2]

  1. Aplaceformom.com. (n.d) Assisted Living. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.aplaceformom.com/assisted-living
  2. Assistedlivingfacilities.org. (n.d.) What is Assisted Living? Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.assistedlivingfacilities.org/resources/what-is-assisted-living-/

Assisted Living Centers

Assisted Living Centers are facilities, or multiple facilities on one ground, that combine support for seniors with housing, healthcare and recreational activity.[1] These centers are equipped with medical assistance, and general assistance is available 24/7 for the seniors living on the center’s grounds.[1] In some cases, Assisted Living Centers have different facilities within that are specific to certain elder needs, such as having a dementia unit.

  1. Assistedlivingfacilities.org. (n.d.) What is Assisted Living? Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.assistedlivingfacilities.org/resources/what-is-assisted-living-/

Assisted Living Communities

Assisted Living Communities are housing facilities provide residents with a range of service to support their living conditions within the facility.[1][2] Services given at Assisted Living Communities often include: medical help, meals, activities, and traveling outside of the community.[1][2]

  1. Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA). Philosophy of Assisted Living. (May 2009.) Retrieved August 9, 2009.
  2. Longtermcareliving.com. Choosing An Assisted Living Residence: A Consumer’s Guide. (2005). Retrieved August 9, 2009, from http://longtermcareliving.com/assess/al/

Assisted Living Facilities 

Assisted Living Facilities offer seniors a home-like setting, in which they can receive round-the-clock help with their medical and daily needs.[1][2] Assisted Living Facilities give seniors the help they need, but allow them to keep some of their independence.[1][2]

  1. Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA). Philosophy of Assisted Living. (May 2009.) Retrieved August 9, 2009.
  2. Longtermcareliving.com. Choosing An Assisted Living Residence: A Consumer’s Guide. (2005). Retrieved August 9, 2009, from http://longtermcareliving.com/assess/al/

Community Care

Community care are services provided by the government or other public agencies that aim to improve aspects of local senior’s lives.[1] Often services such as transportation, meals and social activities are offered.[1] Community Care is given locally.[1]

  1. The U.S. Administration on Aging. (n.d.) Eldercare Locator. Retrieved July 1, 2009, from http://www.eldercare.gov.

Continuing Care

Continuing Care is care received, after retiring, for a specific need. [1] Continuing Care centers often provide mostly health related assistance.[1] Although Continuing Care insinuates that a senior is incapable of taking care of him or herself, it is just available as an option to make taking care of oneself less of a burden.[1] Continuing Care allows family members to worry less about the health of their loved one.[1]

  1. Retirement.org. (n.d.) Continuing Care Retirement Communities. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.retirement.org/continuing-care-retirement-communities/

Convalescent Homes

Convalescent Homes are medical practices that give recovering patients a home-like environment to heal in for short- and long-term.[1] Convalescent Homes are also referred to as Nursing Homes or Rehabilitation Centers. [2] Convalescent Homes often have occupational, speech and physical therapy and psychologists available to give patients motivation and mental support.[2] 

  1. Seniorhomes.com. (n.d.) Convalescent Homes. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.seniorhomes.com/p/convalescent-homes/
  2. Seniorliving.org. (September 2, 2011) Convalescent Homes. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.seniorliving.org/healthcare/convalescent-homes/

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease is a degenerative disease that leads to dementia and can be fatal. [1] It affects about 1 in 1 million people every year, making it a rare disease. [2] Symptoms include but are not restricted to: change in personality, memory loss, insomnia, sudden movements and blurred vision[1]. Symptoms worsen as the disease progresses and so far, no cure has been found. [1]

  1. Mayoclinic.org. (September 9, 2015). Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/creutzfeldt-jakob-disease/basics/symptoms/con-20028005?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=abstract&utm_content=Creutzfeldt-Jakob-disease&utm_campaign=Knowledge-panel
  2. Ninds.nih.gov. (November 2, 2015) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Fact Sheet. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cjd/detail_cjd.htm

Dementia 

Dementia is not a disease but a description of a group of symptoms often associated with Alzheimer’s disease.[1] These symptoms include, but are not limited to: memory loss, loss of judgement abilities, and lack of ability to focus and participate in group activities.[1][2] Many people with dementia often start with certain symptoms and their dementia escalates at a slow rate.[2]

  1. Mayoclini.org. (November 22, 2014). Dementia. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dementia/basics/definition/con-20034399?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=abstract&utm_content=Dementia&utm_campaign=Knowledge-panel
  2. Alz.org. (n.d.) What is Dementia? Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.alz.org/what-is-dementia.asp

Depression

Depression, also known as Major Depressive Disorder, is an illness that has a negative effect on your mentality.[1] Symptoms include, but are not limited to: feeling sad, thoughts of death or suicide, change in appetite, tiredness, and restlessness.[1][2] Some types of Depression are treatable with the correct medical help.[2] In order to be diagnosed with depression, symptoms must carry on for a minimum of two weeks.[1][2]

  1. Psychiatry.org. (March 2015) What is Depression? Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/depression/what-is-depression
  2. Webmd.com. (n.d.) What is Depression? Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/what-is-depression

Elder Care

Elder care is a range of things from medical assistance to activity programs, all of which help to aid a senior person. [1] Type and need level of Elder Care can vary person to person.[2] Needs must be assessed in order for someone to receive the correct elder care for them. [2] Families must individually assess the necessity level for their elderly family member to receive Elder Care.[1]

  1. Seniorcare.org. (n.d.) What is Elder Care? Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.seniorcare.org/elder-care/
  2. Eldercare.net. (November 26, 2011.) How to Access The Need For Eldercare? Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.eldercare.net/how-to-assess-the-need-for-eldercare/

Elder Care Resources

Elder Care Resources are resources available to anyone in order to learn more about elder care. See this list of links for information useful for educating yourself about elder care:

  1. Eldercare.gov (July 12, 2010) Resources. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare.NET/Public/Resources/Index.aspx
  2. Aplaceformom.com (n.d.) Senior Care Resources. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.aplaceformom.com/senior-care-resources

Hospice Care

Hospice Care is end-of-life care given through medical, emotional and religious support.[1] Hospice Care will provide a positive environment given the circumstances, usually an advanced condition or disease requiring 24/7 help.[2] Often hospice care can be provided at home, but it is also at other places, such as nursing homes, hospitals and assisted living facilities.[2]

  1. Webmd.com. (n.d.) Hospice Care Topic Overview. Retrieved December 1, 2015 from http://www.webmd.com/balance/tc/hospice-care-topic-overview
  2. Mayoclinic.org. (February 2, 2013. ) Hospice Care: Caring for the terminally ill. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/end-of-life/in-depth/hospice-care/art-20048050

Huntington’s Disease

Huntington’s Disease is a passed-down disease that breaks down nerve cells in the brain.[1] The disease can cause mental and physical disability.[2] If a parent has Huntington’s Disease, there is a 50/50 chance that a child of that parent will also have the disease.[2] Medication is available but cannot prevent symptoms, only lessen them. [1]

  1. Mayoclinic.org. (July 24, 2014.) Huntington’s disease. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/huntingtons-disease/basics/definition/con-20030685?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=abstract&utm_content=Huntington%27s-disease&utm_campaign=Knowledge-panel
  2. Hdsa.org. (n.d.) What is HD? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://hdsa.org/what-is-hd/

Independent Living

Independent Living, also referred to as a retirement community, is a housing arrangement for seniors where they are not aided by anyone or anything. [1] Independent Living is often communities of retired seniors where everything in the community is more easily accessible and has senior-friendly amenities.[1][2] Independent Living offers seniors an unassisted way of life.[1]

  1. Helpguide.org. (July 2015.) Independent Living For Seniors. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/senior-housing/independent-living-for-seniors.htm
  2. Aplaceformom.com. (n.d.) What is Independent Living? Retrieved December 2, 2015 from http://www.aplaceformom.com/independent-living

Independent Living Communities

Independent Living Communities are senior living communities for seniors experiencing little to no medical issues.[1] In these communities, residents can often have fully furnished housing and some meals per day included in their housing cost.[2] Independent Living Communities offer senior-focused activities, amenities and excursions. [2]

  1. Helpguide.com (July 2015.) Independent Living for Seniors. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/senior-housing/independent-living-for-seniors.htm
  2. Aplaceformom.com (May 6, 2015.)  Senior Housing Options. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.aplaceformom.com/senior-care-resources/articles/senior-housing-options

Independent Living Skills

Independent Living Skills are skills necessary in order to live independently.[1] These skills include, but are not limited to: cooking, cleaning, hygiene, and housekeeping.[1] Independent Living Skills are helpful when living alone or in an Independent Living Community.[1]

  1. Mcil-mn.org. (n.d.) Independent Living Skills. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mcil-mn.org/programs/independent-living-skills

Lewy Body Disease

Lewy Body Disease is a disease associated with dementia.[1][2] Lewy Body Disease causes a decline in brain functions.[1] Lewy bodies are proteins found in the brain that cause a disruption in some mental abilities. [1] Symptoms of Lewy Body Disease include drowsiness and loss of attention.[1]

  1. Mayoclinic.org. (April 17, 2013.) Lewy body dementia. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lewy-body-dementia/basics/definition/con-20025038
  2. LBDA.org. (n.d.) What is LBD? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.lbda.org/category/3437/what-is-lbd.htm

Long Term Care

Long Term Care is everyday care to assist in daily needs.[1] Some vital Long Term Care needs are bathing, eating, dressing, but depending on someone’s need, the care can be individualized.[1] As needs vary, so can length of Long Term Care.[2]

  1. Longtermcare.gov. (n.d.) What is Long Term Care? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://longtermcare.gov/the-basics/what-is-long-term-care/
  2. Longtermcare.gov. (n.d.) How Much Care Will You Need? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://longtermcare.gov/the-basics/how-much-care-will-you-need/

Long Term Memory

A Long Term Memory is a memory that lasts for more than a few minutes.[1] Although it may seem as if Long Term Memories are more forgotten over time, they are really just harder to retrieve.[2] Long Term Memories are not all strong memories, some can be weaker and need to be triggered in order to be remembered. [2]

  1. Human-memory.net. (n.d.) Long Term Memory. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.human-memory.net/types_long.html
  2. BrainHQ.com. (n.d.) Long Term Memory. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.brainhq.com/brain-resources/memory/types-of-memory/long-term-memory

Memory Care

Memory Care is care in a secure facility given to patients with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia or loss of memory.[1] Memory Care gives patients help with daily routine activities that can no longer be performed alone. [1] Memory Care facilities often go beyond just daily routine and into medical care and support. [1][2] Facilities for Memory Care provide round-the-clock staff and scheduled activities. [1][2]

  1. Aplaceformom.com. (n.d.) What is Memory Care? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.aplaceformom.com/alzheimers-care
  2. Seniorhomes.com (n.d.) What is Memory Care? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.seniorhomes.com/p/memory-care/

Memory Games

Memory Games are games that are played to improve memory and attention span.[1] Memory games often introduce players to repetition in order to gain knowledge that they otherwise would not be able to retain.[1] Repetition improves memory retention.[1]

  1. Brainmetrix.com. (n.d.) Memory Games. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.brainmetrix.com/memory-game/

Memory Loss

Memory Loss can include anything from general forgetfulness to Alzheimer’s disease.[1][2] Normal memory loss does not need treatment, but if memory loss escalates, medical help should be seeked.[2] Memory Loss can occur from trauma or throughout daily activity.[1]

  1. WebMD.com. (n.d.) Memory Loss. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.webmd.com/brain/memory-loss
  2. Mayoclinic.org. (June 5, 2014.) Memory Loss: When to seek help. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alzheimers-disease/in-depth/memory-loss/art-20046326

Nursing Homes

Nursing Homes are care facilities for seniors that offer attention to all senior needs at all times.[1][2] Nursing homes are just one level short of hospital care.[2] All types of therapy can be offered at nursing homes.[1] Each patient in a nursing home is supervised 24/7 and all of their individual medical and personal needs are taken care of.[2]

  1. Nlm.nih.gov. (n.d.) Nursing Homes. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/nursinghomes.html
  2. Helpguide.org. (July 2015.) A Guide To Nursing Homes. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/senior-housing/guide-to-nursing-homes.htm

Occupational Therapist

An Occupational Therapist is a therapist that helps people live their daily life to the best it can be.[1] Occupational Therapists can help evaluate different parts of their patient’s life in order to positively optimize their life.[1] Occupational Therapists often work in hospitals or their own offices.[2]

  1. Aota.org. (n.d.) About Occupational Therapy. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.aota.org/about-occupational-therapy.aspx
  2. Explorehealthcareers.org. (n.d.) Occupational Therapist. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://explorehealthcareers.org/en/career/6/Occupational_Therapist

Occupational Therapy

Occupational Therapy is therapy to help positively change someone with any type of handicap improve their happiness.[1] Occupational Therapy encourages changing environment rather than the person.[1] Occupational Therapy is a way to improve your life with the assistance of a trained, holistic professional.[2]

  1. Aota.org. (n.d.) About Occupational Therapy. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.aota.org/about-occupational-therapy.aspx
  2. Explorehealthcareers.org. (n.d.) Occupational Therapist. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://explorehealthcareers.org/en/career/6/Occupational_Therapist

Osteopenia

Osteopenia is when the bones in your body have a low density.[1] Having Osteopenia eventually can lead to osteoporosis.[1][2] Osteopenia does not always lead to osteoporosis, although if bone density continues to be low, it can.[2] Osteoporosis is more common for women than men, and is most common in adults over the age of 50.[1][2]

  1. Webmd.com. (n.d.) Osteopenia. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/tc/osteopenia-overview
  2. Everydayhealth.com (October 9, 2015.) Osteopenia. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.everydayhealth.com/osteoporosis/osteopenia/

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is weakening of bones, causing increased chance of breakage or pain in certain areas of the body.[1] Symptoms of osteoporosis include, but are not limited to: back pain, height loss and bad posture.[1] With osteoporosis, bone fractures may occur more often.[1]

  1. Mayoclinic.org. (December 13, 2014.) Osteoperosis. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/osteoporosis/basics/complications/con-20019924?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=abstract&utm_content=Osteoporosis&utm_campaign=Knowledge-panel

Palliative Care

Palliative Care is care specifically for people with extreme illnesses.[1] Palliative care does not focus on end-of-life patients, but anyone who is in chronic condition that needs support.[2] Palliative staff are professionals that have experience in their fields and are often chosen by the patient for the patient.[1]

  1. Getpalliativecare.org. (n.d.) What is Palliative Care? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from https://getpalliativecare.org/whatis/
  2. Webmd.com (n.d.) What is Palliative Care? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.webmd.com/palliative-care/what-is-palliative-care

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s Disease is a chronic disease that worsens over time associated with the brain.[1][2] Symptoms of Parkinson’s include, but are not limited to: shaky hands, and bad posture.[1] Parkinson’s affects neurons, killing them and releasing dopamine. [2] As the Parkinson’s continues to progress, dopamine levels decrease and the brain cannot continue functioning properly and directing the body correctly.[2]

  1. Mayoclinic.org. (July 7, 2015.) Parkinson’s Disease. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/parkinsons-disease/basics/definition/con-20028488?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=abstract&utm_content=Parkinsons-disease&utm_campaign=Knowledge-panel
  2. Pdf.org. (n.d.) What is Parkinson’s Disease? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.pdf.org/about_pd

Physical Therapist

Physical Therapists are professionals in the health field that help healing patients improve their mobility and physical strength.[1] Physical Therapists aim to encourage and aid patients with their impairments or limitations due to a medical condition.[1][2] Physical Therapists often work in their own practices or in practices with multiple physical therapists.[2]

  1. Apta.org. (November 24, 2015.) About Physical Therapists. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.apta.org/AboutPTs/
  2. Mayo.edu. (November 19, 2015) Physical Therapy. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mayo.edu/mshs/careers/physical-therapy

Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy is the healing of any illness through physical treatment. [1] Physical Therapy is given to patients by physical therapists. [2] Through careful examination, a physical therapist will evaluate what kind of physical therapy needs to be given.[2] Physical Therapy is a method of rehabilitation often used for muscle related injuries.[1]

  1. Webmd.com. (November 14, 2015.) Physical Therapy Topic Overview. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/tc/physical-therapy-topic-overview
  2. Medicalnewstoday.com. (September 12, 2014.) What is physical therapy (physiotherapy)? What does a physical therapist (physiotherapist) do? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/160645.php

Pick’s Disease

Pick’s disease is a type of dementia, often occurring later in life.[1] Pick’s Disease can also be a tell tale sign of Alzheimer’s disease.[1] Pick’s Disease is most commonly found in adults between the ages of 40 and 60.[1] Symptoms include, but are not limited to: loss of judgement, overeating, and not being functional.[1]

  1. Helpguide.org. (August 2015.) Pick’s Disease. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/alzheimers-dementia/picks-disease.htm

Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation is the healing process from an illness, or anything else a person may be healing from.[1] Rehabilitation can take from hours to days to months, even years.[1] Rehabilitation can be done through physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy.[1]

  1. Healthsouth.com. (n.d.) What is Rehabilitation? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.healthsouth.com/en/experience-healthsouth/what-is-rehabilitation

Respite Care

Respite Care is a relief option for caregivers.[1] Respite care is often time spent in a senior community center.[1] Respite Care gives caregivers the opportunity to have some time off and let the senior spend time with other seniors.[1] This type of care can be individualized and amounts of time spent away from caregivers can vary per person.[2]

  1. Aplaceformom.com. (n.d) What is Respite Care? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.aplaceformom.com/respite-care
  2. Alz.org. (n.d.) Respite Care. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from https://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-dementia-caregiver-respite.asp

Retirement Communities

Retirement Communities are often apartments, homes or building, in which seniors live and have the option to participate in activities on the grounds.[1] Retirement Communities offer a community aspect to living alone for active retirees.[2] Retirement communities are typically available to adults age 55+ and facilities at Retirement Communities accommodate this age group.[1]

  1. Aplaceformom.com. (n.d.) How Can I Find Retirement Homes Near Me? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.aplaceformom.com/retirement-communities
  2. Helpguide.org. (July 2015) Independent Living for Seniors. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/senior-housing/independent-living-for-seniors.htm

Retirement Homes

Retirement Homes are facilities in which retirees can live together with a higher level of care than independent living in a Retirement Community.[1] Retirement Homes offer suite-style or apartment style living with community spaces, such as a dining room and activity room.[2] In Retirement Homes, couples can opt to live together.[2]

  1. Helpguide.org. (July 2015) Independent Living for Seniors. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/senior-housing/independent-living-for-seniors.htm
  2. Seniorhomes.com. (n.d.) Retirement Homes: A Good Choice for Seniors. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.seniorhomes.com/p/retirement-homes/

Retirement Living

Retirement Living is independent living after retirement.[1] Retirement Living offers many advantages such as more leisure time, activities with people of the same age group and interest, and more time spent without the stress of work.[1] Retirement Living can be in a retirement community, offering special amenities included in your housing cost.[1]

  1. Helpguide.org. (July 2015) Independent Living for Seniors. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/senior-housing/independent-living-for-seniors.htm

Senior Care

Senior Care, also known as elder care, is care for senior citizens.[1] Often Senior Care is assistance in daily activities, aiding seniors with daily needs that cannot be done alone, and keeping seniors company.[1] Senior Care can be necessary after a senior falls, has an illness or is unable to care for themselves anymore.[1]

  1. Aging-parents-and-elder-care.com. (n.d.) Elder Care – First Steps. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.aging-parents-and-elder-care.com/Pages/Elder_Care_First_Steps.html

Short Term Memory

Short Term Memory is the memory you retain for between 15-30 seconds after an event has occurred.[1][2] Short term memories are quickly forgotten.[1] Short Term Memory refers to only temporary memories.[2] Although quickly forgotten, short term memories can be remembered with triggers, for a limited amount of time.[2]

  1. Psychology.about.com. (June 19, 2015.) Short Term Memory. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://psychology.about.com/od/memory/f/short-term-memory.htm
  2. Simplypsychology.org. (2009.) Short Term Memory. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.simplypsychology.org/short-term-memory.html

Skilled Nursing

Skilled Nursing is specific attention given by medical health professionals, typically in a Skilled Nursing Facility or Nursing Home.[1] Skilled Nursing is often offered to patients for rehabilitation.[1] Skilled Nursing can provide patients with individualized care at a facility that can keep track of the patient’s needs 24/7.[1]

  1. Seniorhomes.com. (n.d.) Skilled Nursing Care. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.seniorhomes.com/p/skilled-nursing-care/

Skilled Nursing Facilities

Skilled Nursing Facilities are very similar to Nursing Homes but provide more specialized care for each patient.[1] Skilled Nursing Facilities can offer individual rooms and shared rooms with or without extra amenities.[1] A Skilled Nursing Facility aims to provide patients with the skilled service they need to heal and get back to living life outside of a facility.[1]

  1. Skillednursingfacilities.org. (n.d.) What are Skilled Nursing Facilities? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.skillednursingfacilities.org/resources/what-are-skilled-nursing-facilities-/

Speech Therapist

A Speech Therapist, or a Speech Language Pathologist, is a professional that works with people who have speech impediments or are learning to speak again.[1] Speech Therapists are licensed to treat and help teach people with speech impediments.[1] Sometimes Speech Therapists help with swallowing issues, as well.[1]

  1. Redlands.edu. (n.d.) What is a Speech Pathologist? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.redlands.edu/academics/college-of-arts-sciences/undergraduate-studies/communicative-disorders/4580.aspx#.Vl_0vmSrSDU

Speech Therapy

Speech Therapy provides patients with help fixing speech impediments, and treats language disorders.[1] Speech Therapy can also improve eating, swallowing or drinking issues, as well as speaking ability.[2] Speech Therapy is available in a wide range of settings from private practices to schools.[2]

  1. Asha.org. (n.d.) Speech, Language, and Swallowing. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from  http://www.asha.org/public/speech/
  2. Rcslt.org. (n.d.) What is Speech and Language Therapy? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.rcslt.org/speech_and_language_therapy/what_is_an_slt

Stroke

A Stroke is when blood flow to the brain is shut off in a certain area.[1] During a Stroke, brain cells die.[1] When brain cells die during a stroke, the functions that the body controlled with those brain cells, are lost.[1] A Stroke is a serious medical emergency that is needed to be tended to right away.[2] Stroke can now be treated and many symptoms can show, alerting people nearby that someone is having a stroke.[2]

  1. Stroke.org. (n.d.) What is Stroke? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.stroke.org/understand-stroke/what-stroke
  2. Mayoclinic.org. (n.d.) Stroke. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/stroke/symptoms-causes/dxc-20117265

Vascular Dementia

Vascular Dementia is dementia occurring as a result of brain damage.[1] Vascular Dementia happens when oxygen is not properly flowing to the brain.[1][2] Vascular Dementia often is prevalent following a stroke.[1] High blood pressure and high cholesterol levels can contribute to the occurrence of Vascular Dementia.[1]

  1. Mayoclinic.org. (May 2, 2014.) Vascular Dementia. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/vascular-dementia/basics/definition/con-20029330
  2. Alz.org. (n.d.) Vascular Dementia Symptoms. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.alz.org/dementia/vascular-dementia-symptoms.asp

Vocational Rehabilitation

Vocational Rehabilitation allows a person with a physical or mental disability to change their career and maintain their career change.[1] Vocational Rehabilitation is provided by the government to assist service-focused disabilitated people get back to work.[2] A person must be eligible before they can join a Vocational Rehabilitation program.[1][2]

  1. Rehabworks.org. (n.d.) Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.rehabworks.org/faq.shtml
  2. Disabledveterans.org. (n.d.) What is Vocational Rehabilitation? Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://www.disabledveterans.org/get-voc-rehab/what-is-vocational-rehabilitation/

Working Memory

A Working Memory is the memory you use to recall steps of information or information that is given to you in an order.[1] A Working Memory retains important information that can be repeated throughout someone’s life.[1] The Working Memory is connected to the Long Term Memory.[1]

  1. Learningworksforkids.com. (n.d.) Thinking Skills: Working Memory. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://learningworksforkids.com/skills/working-memory/